Tech LadyMafia

Tech LadyMafia

humansofnewyork:

“We were a two career family. I was a nuclear engineer. I designed shields for the fuel reactors on the first nuclear submarines. He was a carpenter.”

humansofnewyork:

“We were a two career family. I was a nuclear engineer. I designed shields for the fuel reactors on the first nuclear submarines. He was a carpenter.”

Berkeley, Stanford and a handful of other universities have experienced a marked uptick in the numbers of female computer science students. Those increases have also coincided with a reimagining of computer science classes, especially introductory ones. In some cases, that meant doing away with aspects of classes that seemed to specifically discourage young women.

For the unaware, Mae Jemison was the first African American woman in space and the first real astronaut to appear on Star Trek (TNG season 6, ep. 24, if you’re interested).

Earlier this month, she appeared at the Makers Conference to talk about 100 Year Starship, an incredible project that aims to make interstellar travel possible within the next century. In this short clip, she discusses how humanity can’t tackle such a monumental challenge “with just half the population.” We couldn’t agree more.

theatlantic:

There Are 3 States Where Not a Single Girl Took the AP Computer Science Exam

When people talk about how to diversify the tech field, a common solution is, “Start earlier.” Rather than focus on getting women and minorities hired at tech startups or encouraging them to major in computer science in college, there should be a push to turn them on to the discipline when they’re still teenagers—or even younger.
“It’s already too late,” Paul Graham, founder of the tech entrepreneur boot camp Y Combinator, said last month in a controversial interview. “What we should be doing is somehow changing the middle school computer science curriculum or something like that.”
Right now, the “start early” strategy doesn’t seem to be working: The students doing advanced computer science work in high school remain overwhelmingly white and male. According to data from the College Board compiled by Georgia Tech’s Barbara Ericson, only a small percentage of the high-schoolers taking the Advanced Placement Computer Science exam are women. Black and Latino students make up an even lower percentage of the test-takers.
Ericson’s analysis of the data shows that in 2013, 18 percent of the students who took the exam were women. Eight percent were Hispanic, and four percent were African-American. In contrast, Latinos make up 22 percent of the school-age population in the U.S.; African-Americans make up 14 percent. (I don’t need to tell you that women make up about half.)
Read more. [Image: Jim Mone]

theatlantic:

There Are 3 States Where Not a Single Girl Took the AP Computer Science Exam

When people talk about how to diversify the tech field, a common solution is, “Start earlier.” Rather than focus on getting women and minorities hired at tech startups or encouraging them to major in computer science in college, there should be a push to turn them on to the discipline when they’re still teenagers—or even younger.

It’s already too late,” Paul Graham, founder of the tech entrepreneur boot camp Y Combinator, said last month in a controversial interview. “What we should be doing is somehow changing the middle school computer science curriculum or something like that.”

Right now, the “start early” strategy doesn’t seem to be working: The students doing advanced computer science work in high school remain overwhelmingly white and male. According to data from the College Board compiled by Georgia Tech’s Barbara Ericson, only a small percentage of the high-schoolers taking the Advanced Placement Computer Science exam are women. Black and Latino students make up an even lower percentage of the test-takers.

Ericson’s analysis of the data shows that in 2013, 18 percent of the students who took the exam were women. Eight percent were Hispanic, and four percent were African-American. In contrast, Latinos make up 22 percent of the school-age population in the U.S.; African-Americans make up 14 percent. (I don’t need to tell you that women make up about half.)

Read more. [Image: Jim Mone]

It’s important to point out gender disparities, but repeated laments about the dearth of women in the industry tend to reinforce the belief that there are no women, rendering invisible the women who are doing this work. “The numbers are low, but they’re not zero,” says Natalia Oberti Noguera, founder and chief executive of the Pipeline Fellowship, a program that trains women to become tech investors. “As much as we need to increase diversity, we need to increase visibility of current diversity.” The tech industry may have a problem with women, but women don’t have a problem with technology.
This kind of privilege that I – and other people who looked like me – possessed was silent, manifested not in what people said, but rather in what they didn’t say. We had the privilege to spend enormous amounts of time developing technical expertise without anyone’s interference or implicit discouragement. Sure, we worked really hard, but our efforts directly translated into skill improvements without much loss due to interpersonal friction. Because we looked the part.
speech has private social consequences, and it’s ridiculous to expect otherwise. Whether sincere or motivated by poseur edginess, controversial words have social consequences. Those social consequences are inseparable from the free speech and free association rights of the people imposing them. It is flatly irrational to suggest that I should be able to act like a dick without being treated like a dick by my fellow citizens.

jtotheizzoe:

A New Generation of Astronauts

Have you met NASA’s 2013 astronaut class? Well, they’re about to give you goosebumps.

Learn more about them here.

GOOSEBUMPS

Perhaps it is unfair to visit the sins of the medium upon a work as well made as this one. But not after an E3 during which Microsoft held a public relations event that featured 13 exclusive games and zero female protagonists for its forthcoming Xbox One; not after an E3 in which almost no women spoke during either Microsoft’s or Sony’s preconference spectacles; not after an E3 in which the two women who did appear onstage for Microsoft were alternately received with wolf whistles and told, while losing during a demonstration of a fighting game, “Just let it happen; it’ll be over soon.” A sickness resides at the heart of this promising, potentially transformative medium.
cruello:

Astronaut Anna Fisher
John Bryson

cruello:

Astronaut Anna Fisher

John Bryson

And I am not advising younger women (or any woman) to tough it out. You can lash back, which I have done too often and which has rarely served me well. You can quit and look for other jobs, which is sometimes a very good idea. But the prejudice will follow you. What will save you is tacking into the love of the work, into the desire that brought you there in the first place. This creates a suspension of time, opens a spacious room of your own in which you can walk around and consider your response. Staring prejudice in the face imposes a cruel discipline: to structure your anger, to achieve a certain dignity, an angry dignity.